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Grand Rapids, MI 49504

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616-299-1005

   By Appointment Everyday

Fulton Street Farmers Market

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Broccoli Health Benefits  

Broccoli is a rich source of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Antioxidants can help prevent the development of various conditions.

The body produces molecules called free radicals during natural processes such as metabolism, and environmental stresses add to these. Free radicals, or reactive oxygen species, are toxic in large amounts. They can cause cell damage that can lead to cancer and other conditions.

The body can eliminate many of them, but dietary antioxidants can help.

 

Reducing the risk of cancer

Cruciferous vegetables contain a range of antioxidants, which may help prevent the type of cell damage that leads to cancer.

One of these is sulforaphane, which is a sulfur-containing compound that gives cruciferous vegetables their bitter bite.

Some scientists have suggested that cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli may play a role in "green chemoprevention," in which people use either the whole plant or extracts from it to help prevent cancer.

Cruciferous vegetables also contain indole-3-carbinol. Research from 2019 suggests that this compound may have powerful antitumor properties.

Cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, turnips, cabbage, arugula, broccolini, daikon, kohlrabi, and watercress may all have similar properties.

 

Improving bone health

Calcium and collagen work together to make strong bones. Over 99% of the body's calcium is present in the bones and teeth. The body also needs vitamin C to produce collagen. Both are present in broccoli.

Vitamin K has a role in blood coagulation, but some experts have also suggested that it may help prevent or treat osteoporosis. People with low vitamin K levels may be more likely to experience problems with bone formation. Getting enough vitamin K from the diet may help keep the bones healthy.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), a cup of broccoli weighing around 76 grams (g) contains 3% to 3.5% of a person's daily need for calcium, 45–54% of their daily need for vitamin C, and 64–86% of their daily need for vitamin K, depending on their age and sex.

 

Reducing inflammation

When the immune system is under attack, inflammation can occur.

Inflammation can be a sign of a passing infection, but it can also occur with chronic autoimmune conditions such as arthritis and type 1 diabetes. People with metabolic syndrome may also have high levels of inflammation.

Broccoli may have anti-inflammatory effects, according to a 2014 study. Scientists found that the antioxidant effect of sulforaphane in broccoli helped reduce inflammation markers in laboratory tests. They therefore concluded that the nutrients in broccoli could help fight inflammation.

In a 2018 study, 40 otherwise healthy people with overweight consumed 30 g of broccoli sprouts per day for 10 weeks. At the end of the study period, the participants had significantly lower levels of inflammation.

 

Reducing the risk of diabetes

Research from 2017 suggested that eating broccoli may help people with type 2 diabetes manage their blood sugar levels. This is due to its sulforaphane content.

Also, one 2018 review found that people who consume a high fiber diet are less likely to have type 2 diabetes than those who eat little fiber. Fiber may also help reduce blood sugar levels in people with diabetes.

 

Protecting cardiovascular health

The fiber, potassium, and antioxidants in broccoli may help prevent CVD.

A 2018 population study demonstrated that older women whose diets were rich in cruciferous vegetables had a lower risk of atherosclerosis. This is a condition affecting the arteries that can result in a heart attack or stroke. This benefit may be due to the antioxidant content of cruciferous vegetables, and particularly sulforaphane.

The American Heart Association (AHA) recommend increasing the intake of potassium while adding less sodium to food. This relaxes the blood vessels and lowers the risk of high blood pressure, which can lead to atherosclerosis and other cardiovascular problems.

A cup of broccoli provides almost 5% of a person's daily need for potassium.